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Why Do I Call Myself a Jesus “Hippie”?

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I took this photo just a week ago when me and some friends were preparing some evangelism at a music festival. See what we look like?

I took this photo just a week ago when me and some friends were preparing some evangelism at a music festival. See what we look like?

Hippies aren’t always popular among evangelical Christians. Mark Driscoll has famously said: “Some emergent types want to recast Jesus as a limp-wrist hippie in a dress with a lot of product in His hair, who drank decaf and made pithy zen statements about life while shopping for the perfect pair of shoes. […] I cannot worship the hippie, diaper, halo Christ because I cannot worship a guy I can beat up.” I do agree that Jesus wouldn’t shop shoes or be a Buddhist, but He surely would be able to beat up. In fact, that’s what they actually did with Him on Easter.

The hippie movement emerged in the 60’s and 70’s in the United States and spread quickly to Europe and other parts of the world. It was a youth movement with international influences that emphasized love, peace and understanding, freedom and environmentalism, music, sex and drugs. It was influenced by eastern religions and sparked both new age occultism and the sexual revolution. These latter bits make it understandable why Dricoll doesn’t like hippies very much.

However, in the early 70’s thousands of hippies were saved in what is simply called the Jesus Movement, or the Jesus People Revival. They protested against both drugs and occultism, saying that we should “get high on Jesus” and be baptized in the Holy Spirit instead, but they preserved the hippie passion for peace, justice and a simple lifestyle. Over 100 000 Jesus hippies lived together in communal houses, they were preaching the Gospel in the streets and on the beaches, and many miracles happened as they prayed for the sick and prophesied.

Not everyone liked them though. Cessationist pastor John MacArthur, who thinks that most people in the global charismatic movement are possessed by demons, have said that the Jesus People were “informal, barefoot, beach, drug-induced kind of young people that told the church how we should act. Hymns went out. Suits went out. For the first time in the history of the church, the conduct of the church was conformed in a subculture that was formed on LSD”. This is, however, entirely wrong.

Jesus neither had a suit nor hymns. He had a nomadic church with His disciples that went around on the beaches, in the countrysides and on the streets, healing the sick, raising the dead, preaching the Gospel and helping the widows and orphans. Jesus emphasized compassion, enemy love, economic equality and freedom from religious bondage. He criticized the evange… sorry, pharisees for being judgemental and not realizing that the core command of the Word of God was love.

When we look at the early Christians, we see that they were pacifists, communists and charismatics. These three ingredients are resurrected over and over again in church history, among the monks and nuns, among the Waldensians and Anabaptists, among the Pentecostals and Jesus Hippies. They’re all part of the biblical movement that wants to combine non-violence, community of goods and signs and wonders. This is not a subculture formed on LSD, it’s a prophetic culture formed on the Holy Ghost!

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8 Comments

  1. unklee says:

    I’m with you and the hippies, not Mark Driscoll or John MacArthur. I certainly don’t want to go with a pastor who so misunderstands the teachings of Jesus that he thinks we should judge Jesus by whether we could beat him up!

  2. […] brother Micael Grenholm is a “Jesus hippie”. He just posted a blog that explains a little bit more about why he sees himself that way. I strongly recommend reading […]

  3. Kevin Daugherty says:

    I definitely relate to a lot of that “Jesus hippie” stuff, which I decided to explain here: http://koinoniarevolution.com/2014/06/27/i-want-to-be-a-jesus-hippie/

  4. […] However, in the early 70′s thousands of hippies were saved in what is simply called the Jesus Movement, or the Jesus People Revival. They protested against both drugs and occultism, saying that we should “get high on Jesus” and be baptized in the Holy Spirit instead, but they preserved the hippie passion for peace, justice and a simple lifestyle. Over 100 000 Jesus hippies lived together in communal houses, they were preaching the Gospel in the streets and on the beaches, and many miracles happened as they prayed for the sick and prophesied. Read more… […]

  5. Cari says:

    I’m so happy I found this blog. I’ve been on this Jesus Hippie lifestyle for two months and while I have friends who are Hippies they never really understood how one can be a Hippie and still love Jesus. I’m a Christian, I love Jesus and I love his creation. It’s that simple.

  6. You wrote in your post “when we look at the early christians, we see that they were pacifists, communists, and charismatics”. The God of The bible was the opposite of a pacifist-He was just. Furthermore, Christ said if you’ve seen me, you’ve seen the father”. If God The father is just and righteous then so is Christ. Let’s not forget God told many people to kill in the Old Testament. A passive God does not command such things. Thank you for reading. Please stop spreading this false doctrine. You are misleading people and dishonoring the true character of God and Christ.

  7. unkleE says:

    Hi, I happen to agree with Micael. I feel it isn’t helpful or right to take “if you’ve seen me, you’ve seen the father” to change our view of Jesus, but rather to use Jesus to update our understanding of God. That was clearly what he intended.

    Did you know that several times when the New testament quotes the Old Testament, Jesus and Paul omit sections of the passages that speak of violence and vengeance? You can see this by looking at the passages in Isaiah that Jesus quotes in Luke 4:18-19. Why do you think that is?

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The author

Micael Grenholm - a Swedish charismactivist residing with the Jesus Army in the UK.

Micael Grenholm - a Swedish charismactivist residing with the Jesus Army in the UK.

Check out my YouTube channel!

A Living Alternative

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